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Branded Apparel Aids School In Fundraiser

When the students at South Glens Falls High School reach their 28th straight hour of dancing for charity, one could imagine their energy drained and exhaustion setting in. In fact, it's quite the opposite. The South High Marathon Dance builds to a crescendo of anticipation in its final hour. Announcements are made for how much money was raised, who raised the most and who won the event's multiple raffles. The 800 students who danced all day and night create one final flourish with the Strut Your Stuff performance as their families cheer them on in the school's packed gym. 

For 38 years, the marathon dance has helped those in need, from paying for medical expenses to sending terminally-ill patients on dream vacations. On March 6-7 the students and supporting community raised $621,680, bringing their grand total to more than $4.82 million. It helps people like Nolan Jacox, a five-year-old with an autoimmune disease that causes him to produce too many white blood cells. As a result, he is allergic to most foods and must eat through a feeding tube. 

The school works with a screen printer/embroiderer that prints multiple garments for the recipients, families, production crew, alumni, students and more, as well as a fundraiser design that, last year, rose over $7,000 through sales of hoodies and short- and long-sleeve tees. The back of the shirts feature the name of every person that benefited from the money raised through the dance. "The dance and these shirts have helped with the lives of so many people," says Rob Chadwick, a father of two South High students. 

Over 90% of the student population participates in the dance. A student committee chooses the causes to support and determines the costumes that will be worn at the dance. "The kids prepare for the dance throughout the year," says Chadwick, who also works security for the dance. "They even practice special dances in their gym classes." In this case, the power of dance is more than just a phrase.

Wearables Have Star Power

Ellen DeGeneres knows the power of promotional products. The reigning queen of afternoon talk shows is known for gifting her celebrity guests with wacky, memorable, specially designed promotional items, such as a baby carrier bearing huge angel wings for Victoria's Secret Model Miranda Kerr, complete with makeup and hair accessories.

But one of Ellen's most popular giveaways is her branded male underwear, which she presents to male celebrity guests, sometimes on air, but more often in a gift bag for appearing on the show. A number of recipients, including country singer Tim McGraw and R&B singer/songwriter Jason Derulo have been caught wearing the skivvies in candid photos, the Ellen waistband visible above their low-slung jeans. She's so well-known for the underwear giveaways that OneRepublic lead singer Ryan Tedder turned the tables on Ellen and gifted her on the show with a pair of undies bearing his band's name on the waistband.

DeGeneres offers a wide variety of promotional items for sale on her website, too, including hoodies, socks, T-shirts, bags and many others. Smart marketers like Ellen know that branded apparel is a favorite with consumers across all segments. One promotional expert says that a reason for this is that when someone is wearing such a visible branded item, "it implies a deep level of acceptance and support for that brand."

Celebrities aren't the only ones who make use of branded apparel. Colleges and universities are one of the top markets for apparel today, says The Scarlet Marketeer's Mary Ellen Sokalsi, citing admissions, bookstores, athletic wear, fraternities and sororities as prospective niches. "They either want hip, soft comfortable fashions, hardcore workout wear or spirit-boosting pride wear with a collegiate tone," she says. "The fabrics, styling and imprint are all important. The synergy of the three can make or break a promotion."

For example, Portland State University (PSU) wanted to build branding around a program, "Portland State of Mind" that celebrated events around the Portland community and on campus. So they contacted their promotional products partner who provided the school with T-shirts. The tees had a Portlandia style and feel, and were designed by PSU student artists, which included images of a campus food cart and the "Victor Viking" school mascot. The tees were sold online and on campus, and were advertised in the school's alumni newsletter, that goes out to some 100,000 people.

The success of the first year's program led to a new program called "Fearless" in which PSU students are encouraged to be fearless in their choice of academic pursuit and lifestyle. The new Fearless e-store gives the students the ability to customize their apparel to proclaim their choice. They could be a "Fearless Architect," or a "Fearless Teacher" or "Fearless Fireman." The Fearless program is supported online by YouTube videos produced by students that explain the programs and how to order the merchandise. Both programs have been very popular in terms of orders and visibility on campus. For example, Portland State University (PSU) wanted to build branding around a program, "Portland State of Mind" that celebrated events around the Portland community and on campus. So they contacted their promotional products partner who provided the school with T-shirts. The tees had a Portlandia style and feel, and were designed by PSU student artists, which included images of a campus food cart and the "Victor Viking" school mascot. The tees were sold online and on campus, and were advertised in the school's alumni newsletter, that goes out to some 100,000 people.


The success of the first year's program led to a new program called "Fearless" in which PSU students are encouraged to be fearless in their choice of academic pursuit and lifestyle. The new Fearless e-store gives the students the ability to customize their apparel to proclaim their choice. They could be a "Fearless Architect," or a "Fearless Teacher" or "Fearless Fireman." The Fearless program is supported online by YouTube videos produced by students that explain the programs and how to order the merchandise. Both programs have been very popular in terms of orders and visibility on campus. 

Red Dress Pin Works As Powerful Reminder

The Heart Truth hosts its annual Red Dress Collection Fashion Show during New York’s Fashion Week each February to warn women of their number-one killer. The show is always a huge success with thousands of attendees, many notable celebrities, media personalities and fashion designers, and the event gets a boost with the effective use of branding elements.


The Heart Truth created and introduced the Red Dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness in 2002, and each year at the fashion show, the hype and enthusiasm is tangible.


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Diet Coke sponsored the show, and its national promotional partner provided the branding. Banners and signs displaying the brand’s support of the Heart Truth could be seen throughout the venue, complete with spokespeople and reporters, all donning their brightest red garments. 


Brochures, pamphlets and other educational materials were handed out to attendees as well as the iconic Red Dress pin. According to Mariana Eberle-Blaylock, account director of social marketing at Ogilvy Washington, the Red Dress pin has become the organization’s staple promotional product throughout the years. 

“We give away pins at different campaigns year-round, but the fashion show is a big night for us,” Eberle-Blaylock says. “Each attendee gets a Red Dress pin and we always secure it to a postcard that lists facts and messages about heart disease. We change the messages to fit our audiences because every race faces different risks.”

Eberle-Blaylock notes that they translate all the materials into Spanish (heart disease hits Hispanic women especially hard). “The message is always customized to the audience, but the colors and symbols are the same in order to keep our Heart Truth brand consistent,” she says.


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Show attendees also received goodie bags of Diet Coke-branded products including a notebook, a straw and a bottle of the famous carbonated soft drink designed specifically for its partnership with the Heart Truth.


Although February is donned Heart Health Month, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute outreach continues throughout the year with social marketing campaigns and events. Red Dress pins, DVDs, cookbooks, fact sheets, posters and other marketing materials are distributed to communities worldwide and the organization grows every year with new partnerships and campaigns.
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